Posts Tagged With ‘wireshark’

  1. Frame bytes vs. frame file headers

    When capturing frames from a network there is more information recorded into the capture file than just the bytes of each frame. If you have ever looked at the PCAP or PCAPng file format specifications you have seen that each frame has an additional frame header containing important information that wasn’t part of the frame […]

  2. The Megalodon Challenge

    This year at Sharkfest I offered a special capture file challenge I called “The Megalodon Challenge”. Other than the “normal” challenges you could find at The Reef it was not limited to the size of 100MB, and the solution cannot be reduced to a couple of words or numbers. After Sharkfest I was asked if […]

  3. Sharkfest 2015 recap

    “Jasper, do you have a minute?” I think that is the one sentence that I heard most at Sharkfest 2015, which is the annual Wireshark developer and user conference. Which makes it the most interesting place to be for anyone doing network analysis, for business or fun/hobby (yes, those exist). People asking me for a […]

  4. Port Numbers reused

    Sharkfest 2015 is coming up fast (22 days, 12 hours to go when typing this), and so I spend the morning hours of my Saturday for preparation of materials for my three talks. Since that also involves adding features and fixing bugs in TraceWrangler (which I also need for the large demo part of my […]

  5. Deep Dive: Frame Timestamps

    Last week Uwe, one of the instructors of the Wireshark class I created for FastLane, gave me a call in the evening. He was teaching a 5 day class in Hamburg at the time, and had had a student ask about a peculiar problem with frame/packet timestamps. I remembered that I had read something about […]

  6. Zombie Packet Mayhem!

    My previous post was about one of multiple false positives a network analyst needs to keep an eye out for to avoid writing down findings in a report that weren’t really there. So when I looked at my Sharkfest traces to see what other topic I could write this post about I realized that I […]

  7. TCP Analysis and the Five-Tuple

    The TCP expert of Wireshark is doing a pretty good job at pinpointing problems, helping analysts to find the packets where things go wrong. Unfortunately, there are some things that can throw the expert off pretty badly, which can fool inexperienced analysts in believing that there are big problems on the network. I did a […]

  8. Advanced display filtering

    Wireshark has a lot of display filters, and the filtering engine is really powerful. You can filter on almost anything in a packet, and ever since the filter box started suggesting possible filter expressions it got really easy to find the one you wanted.

  9. Working with multi-point captures

    Every now and then most analysts run into a troubleshooting situations where they need to capture the same packets at different locations in the network. Some reasons for such multi-point captures include having to determine if packets get delayed at some point in the network (this would be one of the few cases where “it […]

  10. Determining network protocols

    If you spent enough time using Wireshark or any other network analysis tool, you’ll sooner or later be able to even read bare hex dumps of packets, at least partially (it’s a little bit like Neo seeing the Matrix). So maybe you run across a text dump of a packet like this one: 0000  00 […]