Posts Tagged With ‘wireshark’

  1. The Network Capture Playbook Part 3 – Network cards

    One of the most common answers that come to my mind when being asked questions during or after a talk at a conference is the famous phrase “it depends…”. This may sound unsatisfactory at first, but the problem with a lot of questions regarding network analysis (and packet capture) is that there are always so […]

  2. The Network Capture Playbook Part 2 – Speed, Duplex and Drops

    In part one of the playbook series we took a look at general Ethernet setups and capture situations, so in this post (as in all others following this one) I’ll assume you’re familiar with the topics previously discussed. This time, let’s check out how speed and duplex can become quite important, and what “drops” are […]

  3. Trace File Case Files: SMB2 Performance

    We had an interesting question regarding SMB2 performance on the Wireshark Q&A forum recently. Upon request the person asking the question was able to add a couple of trace files (=”capture” files).  The question and a link to the traces can be found here: https://ask.wireshark.org/questions/55972/slow-writes-even-slower-reads-spanning-wan-to-netapp Since the question nicely fits into the scope my talk […]

  4. Sharkfest Europe 2016 Retrospective

    Finally, the annual Wireshark developer and user conference happened in Europe for the first time in October 2016 at the Hotel Papendal in Arnhem, the Netherlands. It was something many people kept asking for, and with a lot of work and effort, Janice and her team made it happen.

  5. My packet analysis toolset

    As any analyst (regardless of the topic being networks, IT security, forensics etc.) will tell you, it’s almost always a combination of tools that is used to get the results. And since I thought it might be useful, here’s my list of what I primarily use when analyzing packets.

  6. How to Use Wireshark to Steal Passwords

    Wireshark is a great tool to capture network packets, and we all know that people use the network to login to websites like Facebook, Twitter or Amazon. So there must be passwords or other authorization data being transported in those packets, and here’s how to get them.

  7. Sharkfest 2016 recap

    Another Sharkfest has come and gone, and once again it has been a great conference. If you’re into packet analysis, network forensics or network troubleshooting there is no other event that has the same density of information. It’s really a “specialist” conference, in a very open and friendly way, and newcomers are always welcome.

  8. Megalodon challenge solution

    During Sharkfest 2015 I put up a challenge that was different from the usual challenges offered. The pcap files are a lot bigger, the task to solve less specific, and the answer not a simple “easy to verify” answer. I promised to put up my solution a few months after posting the challenge to this […]

  9. Verifying IoCs with Snort and TraceWrangler

    After detecting a network breach it is a good idea to scan the network for further Indicators of Compromise (IoC) to check for further malicious activity. The IoCs are usually derived from forensic investigations into network packets and compromised hosts, and can be quite unique when it comes to more sophisticated attacks (let’s avoid mentioning […]

  10. Frame bytes vs. frame file headers

    When capturing frames from a network there is more information recorded into the capture file than just the bytes of each frame. If you have ever looked at the PCAP or PCAPng file format specifications you have seen that each frame has an additional frame header containing important information that wasn’t part of the frame […]