Posts Tagged With ‘TraceWrangler’

  1. Sharkfest 2017 US Recap – 10 years of Sharkfest!

    Time always flies at Sharkfest, the annual Wireshark conference, and the 2017 edition – being the 10th Sharkfest in the US – has been no exception. On Friday Sake and me talked about how fast the 3 day conference had felt and we both agreed that “hm, it seems just to have started moments ago […]

  2. The Wireshark Q&A trace file sharing tutorial

    In many of those cases the person asking a question on the Wireshark Q&A site posts screenshots or ASCII dumps of the packet list, which is very hard to work with when you’re trying to help. It is much easier if you can get a PCAP or PCAPng file instead, but there are two major […]

  3. My packet analysis toolset

    As any analyst (regardless of the topic being networks, IT security, forensics etc.) will tell you, it’s almost always a combination of tools that is used to get the results. And since I thought it might be useful, here’s my list of what I primarily use when analyzing packets.

  4. Megalodon challenge solution

    During Sharkfest 2015 I put up a challenge that was different from the usual challenges offered. The pcap files are a lot bigger, the task to solve less specific, and the answer not a simple “easy to verify” answer. I promised to put up my solution a few months after posting the challenge to this […]

  5. Verifying IoCs with Snort and TraceWrangler

    After detecting a network breach it is a good idea to scan the network for further Indicators of Compromise (IoC) to check for further malicious activity. The IoCs are usually derived from forensic investigations into network packets and compromised hosts, and can be quite unique when it comes to more sophisticated attacks (let’s avoid mentioning […]

  6. Frame bytes vs. frame file headers

    When capturing frames from a network there is more information recorded into the capture file than just the bytes of each frame. If you have ever looked at the PCAP or PCAPng file format specifications you have seen that each frame has an additional frame header containing important information that wasn’t part of the frame […]

  7. Sharkfest 2015 recap

    “Jasper, do you have a minute?” I think that is the one sentence that I heard most at Sharkfest 2015, which is the annual Wireshark developer and user conference. Which makes it the most interesting place to be for anyone doing network analysis, for business or fun/hobby (yes, those exist). People asking me for a […]

  8. Sanitizing IPv6 addresses

    Tracewrangler was always supporting IPv6 from the start (even though without extension headers except fragmentation), but last weekend I realized that I could improve the sanitization feature due to something that is missing compared to IPv4: subnet masks. This may sound funny, but in fact the missing subnet masks help.

  9. Diagnosing intermittent “network” problems

    There’s that one thing that customers usually ask, and that question is if I would be able to help diagnosing a problem on the network. My answer has two parts: If we can capture the problem situation in packets, I will find it When I find it, I’ll tell you if it’s a network problem […]

  10. The trouble with multiple capture interfaces

    The PCAPng file format Starting with Wireshark 1.8, the old PCAP format was replaced by PCAPng as the new default file format for packet captures. I have to admit that I may be one of the people to blame for this – at the end of Sharkfest 2011 we had a panel discussion with Gerald […]